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Frequently Asked Questions

What is the current value of my instrument?
Where can I purchase my Scherzer Trumpet?
In the unlikely case of a manufacturer’s defect: how do I proceed to claim the warranty?
Where do our brand name Scherzer come from?
What is a 3B linkage system?
On my older instrument, will red spots visible- what is it?

What is the current value of my instrument?

The value of a musical instrument can not be determined by the model and age only – playability and overall condition play an even more important role.

Considering this, it is easy to understand that no one has a chance to realistically comment on the value of a specific instrument from the distance without being able to physically inspect the instrument: chances are that repairs, overhauls and/or modifications were made by the previous owner(s) at some point – also, no one can comment on valve or slide action, dents or scratches or general wear and tear of the lacquer or plating from the distance.

Your local repair expert will be able to assist you and provide a detailed evaluation after inspecting your instrument physically and professionally.

Where can I purchase my Scherzer Trumpet?

Scherzer trumpets and accessories are only sold through authorized agents.
A dealer in your area can be found here.

In the unlikely case of a manufacturer’s defect: how do I proceed to claim the warranty?

(For warranty content, please see the user and warranty information booklet that is accompanied with each instrument)

Always immediately contact the dealer where you have purchased your instrument. They will handle the warranty for you and determine which steps are necessary to fix the problem in close cooperation with us.

With each and every warranty claim the serial number (to be found on the leadpipe receiver) must be provided.

Any repair must be approved by the manufacturer prior to being executed – or you risk voiding the warranty.

For obvious reason, damages due to improper use of the instrument, lacking care and maintenance and unauthorized repairs are not covered by the manufacturer’s warranty.

Where do our brand name Scherzer come from?

Meister Johannes Scherzer: Emil Knoth after he studied and worked under Phillip Reichel from 1884 – 1900 founded the RINO workshop in Markneukirchen.

His son Kurt Knoth then took over and moved the workshop to Mosenstreet where his nephew Johannes Scherzer studied,worked after the war and made his mastership in 1951. Johannes Scherzer builds in the initial workshop the entire line of brass, but he would from the VEB to rotary valve trumpets limited because its Piccolo had worldwide “Forex Success”. Pierre Thibaud, and then Maurice Andre made it well known.
Mesiter-Scherzer-Logo-3229cf7a

What is a 3B linkage system?

In contrary to the existing linkages, the new 3B linkage system uses two stell balls in bronze ball bearings for each valve in order to optimise the transmission: one ball connects the valve action rod to the bottom of the lever, the other one is connected to the stop arm.

3B stands for “Bronze Ball Bearing”, or in other words for a steel ball that is held within a bronze bearing. Additionally to this perfect gliding combination of steel and bronze, a spring on the connector to the valve action rod keeps the linkage in an optimal position to guarantee a perfectly smooth moving. In the end, it feels not much different to a string mechanism rotary valve.

On my older instrument, will red spots visible- what is it?

This is most likely a so-called “red dot”, a copper hole. Constant exposure of moisture – for example when the instrument after playing not drying – after a long period leads to dezikinfication. That means the zinc is removed from the connection material is removed or “corrode” and the red dot left behind. The affected part must be replaced. This is easy with a little care to avoid.

Please see also our care instructions.

Incidentally, gold brass (and silver) is largely resistant to dezikinfication.

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